Monday, January 2, 2017

Canadian Week in Review - 02 January 2017

I have come across the following Canadian genealogy, history and heritage websites, social media, and newspaper articles this past week that were of interest to me, and I thought you might be interested in them, too.

This Week in Canadian History

John Cabot

It is written that John Cabot reached the island of Newfoundland, which he claimed for England, in December 1497. He was born c1450 and died c1500. 

To mark the Canadian celebration of the 500th anniversary of Cabot's expedition in 1997, the Canadian and British governments both accepted a widely-held conclusion that the landing site was at Cape Bonavista, Newfoundland. 

Quebec City

The troops of Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold are defeated before Quebec City on 31 December 1755. 

Richard Montgomery and Benedict Arnold led a force of about 1,200 American army forces and Canadian militia in a multi-pronged attack on the city, which, due to bad weather (there was a blizzard) and bad timing, did not start well, and ended with Montgomery dead, Arnold wounded, and Daniel Morgan and more than 400 men captured. The battle was the first major defeat of the war for the Americans. 

Prince Edward Island Railroad

All rail service was terminated in Prince Edward Island after Canadian National Railway abandons its historic rail lines in the province. 

The railway ran from Tignish in the west to Elmira in the east, with major spurs in the capital in Charlottetown, Montague, and Georgetown and the original eastern terminus at Souris. 

The line officially closed on 31 December 1989, and the rails removed between 1990 and 1992.

Social Media

(Photos) Hants History: Dec. 26, 2016 edition

Here's a look at what was making the news 35 and 50 years ago in the Hants Journal.

Newspaper Articles 


The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum will tweet out its history as nation marks its 150th 

As Jan. 1 marks the start of sesquicentennial celebrations in Canada, it’s also a milestone date for those who safeguard Canada’s military heritage in London. 

Jan. 1, 1888 was the day the infantry school on Oxford Street was declared open, following two years of construction on a budget of $30,000. 

The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum plans to commemorate Canada’s 150th birthday year with tweets detailing 150 significant events in the RCR’s history. 

Black community celebrates Viola Desmond as new face on $10 bill 

Selecting Viola Desmond as the new face on the $10 bill will finally raise the national profile of Canada’s Rosa Parks. 

Many are familiar with Parks’ famous refusal to give up her seat to a white passenger on an Alabama bus in 1955, an act that helped spark the civil rights movement in the U.S.

Students learn indigenous history by reenacting colonization in unique blanket exercise

Three dozen high school students in stocking feet wander quietly over colourful blankets spread across the floor. They are roaming their land. It is centuries ago, and they inhabit a vast place that will one day be known as Canada.

Cobourg 2017 events celebrate Canada 150

Canada 150 is becoming big news, as Jan. 1 of the nation’s sesquicentennial year draws near.

Cobourg is planning its own version, with an amazing string of 2017 events, thanks to its own Cobourg 2017 committee (co-chaired by Nicole Beatty and Peter Delanty).

Early Falconbridge films now at Sudbury archives

A few years ago, Charlie Stafford of British Columbia was researching the history of his hometown of Falconbridge, Ont., in the hopes of writing a book about the town.

While researching, he discovered the City of Greater Sudbury Archives, located in the heart of Falconbridge, and began encouraging former residents who were helping him with his book to donate records to the archives.


History Corner - Some immigrants to the Canadian West came from a well-to-do background 

The photo features Henri Rudolph Roosmale Nepveu — the man standing beside the horse, on his horse ranch near Yorkton in 1889. Henri, who was a banker in his native Netherlands, came to the Yorkton area in 1888, and within a year, had erected this log house and a horse ranch.

British Columbia

Royal B.C. Museum calls on Indigenous people to submit stories about relics

An Indigenous artist and writer says First Nations artifacts in museums are not simply cold, hard objects, but are rather the belongings of families and communities.

The Royal B.C. Museum in Victoria has brought in Francine Cunningham as the guest editor for the spring issue of its digital magazine, Curious, which will focus on Indigenous peoples' relationship to the museum's collections.

Cherryville artist seeks First World War internment camp stories

A Cherryville-based artist is seeking help in providing information and stories on a dark chapter in Canadian history.

Kerri Parnell is working with the Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund to create a series of paintings for a travelling art exhibition that will depict the internment of Ukrainian and Eastern Europeans in Canada during the First World War.

Murals help heal scars of history

The dark past of internment in Vernon, which has long been buried under shame and guilt, is coming to life.

Between 1914 and 1920, more than 96,000 Ukrainians and Europeans living in Canada were imprisoned behind the barbed wire fences of internment camps. They were forced to work for free, carving out highways. 

Canadian Stories this Week 

Social Media
Are you a social media person? Do you want to publicize the Ontario Genealogical Society (OGS) 2017 Conference? Then you should read the press release put out by the OGS last week. 

“Our goal is to help promote Canadian bloggers, social media gurus and the genealogy community. The official OGS Conference 2017 website will have a sidebar where your blog postings will be shared as they are posted. 

There will be a Social Media Team Haven at the conference where we can meet, write our blog entries and post to social media. You will be accredited with an official media tag, as well as get the chance to help promote one of the largest genealogy conferences in Canada”. 

Have you joined? My application is going in today!

If you are interested please send your name, blog name and URL, Twitter handle, and email address to:

Applications close on 20 January 2017. Notifications will be sent by 25 January 2017. 

The year 2017 is looking to be a great one, with all of the things going on in Canada, as our country celebrates its 150th birthday. 

As for myself, I look forward to finishing my Professional Development Certificate towards receiving my PLCGS certificate in 2018 from the National Institute for Genealogical Studies; entering my 7th year as editor of the Ontario Genealogical Society's journal, Families; and continuing on with my genealogical research business,, which will celebrate its 4th year in March.

So it will be a full year, and. hopefully, as successful as 2016!

Meanwhile, speaking of celebrations and successes, please be sure to tell your friends about us here at Our blog is celebrating its 9th blogiversary today!

With over 2,300 posts since the blog's inception on 02 January 2008, there is much to read. Simply use the search box located on the right side of the page to find your favourite tidbit(s) of news and resources on Canadian genealogy, history, and heritage.

Please take a moment to write us a quick note at to say "Hi!", to let us know about something that you or your group is doing, or even to suggest a good news tip we may have missed. We'd love to hear from you, our readers!

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Wishing you and yours all the best for 2017!
Publishers Elizabeth and Mario Lapointe 

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